Your private swath of sand in the Mojave Desert!


Now THIS is a different Spring Break idea, right?! 
Need a writer’s retreat?   A quiet weekend to regroup?   An outpost for a family gathering?
Give me a call!  I can set up all the details:  (609)923-0304

A mere 2 hours outside of LA’s traffic and Hollywood’s glitz lies this:   the Mojave desert!

Did you know that there’s a cabin where you can overnight in the Mojave desert…

BBQ in the stillness of the desert as pallid-winged grasshoppers chirp…
then lounge with a chilled glass on this deck

as dusk settles silently over the land?


WHAT DO YOU NEED FOR AN OVERNIGHT IN THE MOJAVE DESERT?

The cabin comes equipped with linens and full kitchen.  There’s a caretaker (off premises) in case you need assistance, and miles of Mojave desert hiking right out your back door.

ARE THERE ACTUAL TRAILS TO HIKE IN THE MOJAVE DESERT?
Surrounding the cabin are surreal geologic features.  Some are massive, but others are small rock outcroppings – fun for scrambling and perching (best Mojave desert view around!)

Joshua Tree’s ranger station and hiking network is only a 20-minute drive away.

WHAT’S THE FAMOUS TREE OF THE MOJAVE DESERT?

These Dr-Seuss-looking trees with dagger-like spines are called Joshua trees.  They are a highlight of the Mojave desert, and the namesake of the nearby national park.

They were supposedly named by the Mormans, migrating westward, who thought the stark limbs looked like the outstretched arms of the biblical figure, Joshua, beckoning them onward.

WHERE IS THE MOJAVE DESERT?
Wait!  You didn’t know that the US had a bonafide desert?  Here is it:

UNBELIEVABLE CREATURE OF THE MOJAVE DESERT: 
From the road, the Mojave desert looks almost lifeless.   But in fact, if you examine more deeply, you’ll find a variety of Mojave desert plants and animals that are adapted to torrents of rain, strong winds, and extreme climate.

The female Tarantula Hawk Wasp is one fascinating example in the Mojave desert.

She finds a tarantula by smell.   She often seeks it out, in its den, and – after an often acrobatic flipping and flailing, stings the spider, thus paralyzing it for life.

She drinks the body fluids oozing out of the tarantula, in order to replenish her own nutrients which are depleted from the attack –
then she drags the spider back to the burrow (now a burial vault), lays a single egg on the spider’s abdomen, and seals the chamber.

Once the egg hatches,  it begins to suck off the spider (now dead) and eventually rips open the abdomen and “feeds ravenously”.

I’m always eager to talk about YOUR next adventure! 
Grab a 20-minute complimentary get-acquainted session, right here! 

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